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Chey Heap

Chey is a mental health worker from the north of England, currently doing a doctorate in clinical psychology. Her interests include gender, sexual and racial equality, human rights, social inclusion, older citizens, mental health and wellbeing, poverty and disability rights. She's also an ambassador for an international development charity.

  • Posts: 16
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    My Friend is a Superhero – The Story of a Free Children’s Comic Book About Diversity and Disability

    Sometimes we need to be the change that we want to see in the world. Philip Patson – Creative and social entrepreneur, writer, comedian, human rights promoter, and award-winning diversity consultant – is the very definition of a changemaker. He is the Managing Director of Diversity New Zealand, an organisation which offers facilitated discussions, consultations, […]

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    Since When Did Human Rights Become a Debate?

    There is a worrying trend in popular media, whereby “debate” and “free speech” are becoming synonymous with “listening to hate speech”. This is particularly true regarding two recent votes: for Britain to leave the European Union (Brexit) and for the United States voting for the new president. Some people have suggested that pro-equality activists are […]

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    What is the Best Type of Therapy for Me?

    Sometimes the world of psychological therapy can seem like a complex, tangled web. Such therapies include, but are not limited to: psychodynamic (or psychoanalytic) psychotherapy, cognitive analytic therapy (CAT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), dialetical behaviour therapy (DBT), compassion focussed therapy (CFT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), transactional analysis (TA), family therapy (systemic, structural, problem-based, behavioural), […]

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    How Do We Measure Therapeutic Outcomes?

    The phrase evidence-based practice is now common parlance in mental health care. The call for using evidence-based practice can be heard across psychology, social work, psychiatry, occupational health, and a range of other professions. Often, such “evidence” consists of data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised trials, case studies, qualitative focus groups and interviews, and […]

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    The Life of a Social Worker – Interview with Freya Barrington

    Freya Barrington, a highly commended Social Worker, is the author of the international bestseller Known to Social Services. This powerful and unflinching book follows the fictional Social Worker Diane, and the characters she meets during her work at the barren, underprivileged Deacon Hill estate. Known to Social Services offers a glimpse into the world of social […]

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    Shared Humanity after the Orlando shootings

    “We’re all human” is, we hope, a common attitude. It stems from empathy and solidarity –  the idea that, despite our differences, we are all the same. However, whilst it seems like a positive attitude on the surface, the well-intentioned “We’re all human” is more complex than this. It has a darker underside of erasure. […]

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    Is Mental Health Really ‘All in the Mind’?

    Recently, the mental health world of the UK has been struck by quite a debate about the nature of “mental health.” The debate concerns a BBC series called ‘In the Mind.’ An episode called The Not So Secret Life of a Manic Depressive: 10 Years On focused on Stephen Fry’s diagnosis of bipolar disorder and […]

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    Why LGB rights are a Crucial Part of Feminist Values

    Identifying as non-straight, and identifying as a woman: they’re important political, personal and professional issues to think about. And, of course, we need to fight for the rights of both women and LGB (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual) individuals. But are they different things? I’m going to argue that LGB issues and feminism are not only similar, […]

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    Using Superheroes in Play Therapy

    We all have our superheroes especially because superheroes have the ability to inspire, empower, support and occasionally save us. Sometimes, superheroes help us to save ourselves. I have already penned some articles about the magical technique of Superhero Therapy, and how the concept of superheroes can be used in different psychotherapeutic approaches to support people […]

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    The Social Poison of Gaslighting, and How to Deal With It

    The term gaslighting originates from a play/film called Gas Light, in which a man tries to convince his wife she is mad. He does this by changing her environment (e.g. dimming the gas lighting) and then telling her she’s imagining things. As a psychological term, it is essentially a technique that allows someone to bully […]

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    Why Psychologists Are Marching Against Austerity

    As a profession, British psychologists have traditionally been slow to rush to the forefront when it comes to societal, political or social injustices. This is in spite of available information and data – the British Psychological Society, which represents psychologists in the UK, has a list of articles related to Government and Politics alone. Dr. […]

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    Using Superhero Powers with Clients

    Is it a bird, is it a plane? No, it’s Superhero Therapy! Not to be mistaken for when superheroes happen to go into therapy, Superhero Therapy is a technique which can be used to support people who are in distress. This technique can be used across models, professions and theoretical orientations. Dr Janina Scarlet’s account […]

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    Cognitive Dissonance: How We Dismiss the Refugee Crisis

    Whilst politicians appear concerned about the monetary deficit invoked by refugees, many people are currently concerned with what appears to be a deficit in compassion. This is particularly with regard to the current humanitarian crisis of refugees, for reasons ranging from their numbers, their religion, and their reasons. What we are seeing is dehumanisation, which […]

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    Social Workers and Superheroes

    Social Workers and superheroes – what do they have in common? According to a TED talk by Anna Scheyett, they have more in common than you’d expect. In this article, I will look at and builds upon some of the ideas that Anna talks about as it relates to Social Workers and superheroes. I’m going […]

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    Giving Students Therapy is Not the Answer to Dealing with Microaggressions in Education

    This article is continuing analysis of the Atlantic’s article, Coddling of the American Mind written by authors Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff . The authors believe that ‘political correctness’, or reacting to ‘microaggressions’, is damaging students’ intellectual and emotional wellbeing on university campuses. In an earlier article, I considered what microaggressions are and some of the unsaid […]

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    Microaggressions and Trigger Warnings Are Being Deemed Liberal Views Limiting College Students

    After reading the article Coddling of the American Mind in the Atlantic, I felt compelled to pen a response. The article suggests that ‘liberal’ views about use of language, ‘trigger warnings’, microaggressions, and avoiding offensive language are damaging to university students’ academic progression and their emotional wellbeing. The discussion here will be in several parts, the […]