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Meditative Psychotherapy is a unique synthesis of Eastern and Western thought that illuminates each discipline’s strengths and weaknesses in ways that show us how they can enrich each other.

The three elements of Meditative Psychotherapy include “stereophonic listening, understanding and meaning and liberated intimacy.” It involves the centering of self and quieting of the mind to reach greater levels of Self-Connection and deeper experiences of connection with others. And we know that deeper connection with others is the pathway to creating Transformative Relationships ~ another element of the Conscious Service Approach.

Dr. Jeffery Rubin

Jeffery Rubin, Ph.D., is the creator of meditative psychotherapy, a practice he developed through insights gained from decades of study, teaching, and helping thousands of people flourish.

The author of the critically acclaimed books Psychotherapy and Buddhism, The Good Life, and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time, Dr. Rubin is a practicing psychotherapist in New York City and Bedford Hills, NY, and has taught at various universities, psychoanalytic institutes, and Buddhist and yoga centers.

He lectures around the country and has given workshops at the United Nations, the Esalen Institute, the Open Center, the 92nd Street Y, and Yoga Sutra. His pioneering approach to Buddhism and psychotherapy has been featured in The New York Times Magazine.

I am intrigued by paradox. I love the grey area and I am curious to explore the opposite ends of the spectrum. When we talk about Meditation and Psychotherapy, we are doing just that.

Many years ago when I decided to return to university to finish my degree, I made a choice that gave me the opportunity to actively focus my learning in this way. I had previously completed a number of credits towards a degree in Psychology before putting my academic career on hold to have babies. During that time, life changed immensely and when I would think about finishing my degree, I experienced a range of emotions. Sometimes, I would think, “Oh who cares if I ever finish it?” and other times, I felt compelled to complete it simply because I didn’t like the feeling of leaving things undone.

Here is a great example of the power of informal learning ~ the wisdom we gain through simply living our lives that is often disregarded in our society. As a side note, I am convinced when it comes to being of Service in the world, we must begin to honor more deeply the wisdom gained through the school of life in ways that integrate what we innately know as human beings with the theoretical and foundational philosophies associated with helping professions.

Anyway, one day, I decided it was time to go back and finish that degree. As a result of the soul-searching I’d been doing, I couldn’t bring myself to simply return for 3 credits and complete the Psychology degree; it just wasn’t the crux of what most interested me anymore. So, I enrolled in a program that would have me graduate with a double major in Psychology and Religious Studies. I didn’t realize at the time I would be embarking on a journey that would challenge me in paradoxical ways and pull me in opposite directions at times. And I wouldn’t trade that experience for the world.

Opposite Ends of The Spectrum

Psychology is considered a science. There is research and studies and numbers and stats to consider. The emphasis is on proving something and generating data in order to understand human experience.

Religious Studies, depending on where you focus, is much more abstract, without much physical evidence, and has very little to do with numbers and data. Well, at least this was true for me as I chose courses more focused on Spirituality as opposed to the history of Religion or the state of the Church in our society.

People used to ask me “What are you going to do with that degree?” In other words, how would this benefit me vocationally? I could never answer that question. And I still don’t have a solid response. What I can say is it was important to me to follow my curiosity and to follow the path which held the most passion and interest for me. I knew somehow this combination of learning was a way of honoring what I already knew and what I wanted to learn. And I knew it was related to my desire to be of Service in the world.

And you know what? I have drawn on the learning I gained through my studies in Psychology and Religious Studies, coupled with my background in Developmental Services to create the foundation of what is now the Conscious Service Approach.

It All Works Together for Good

There is no one right way or one path to go down. One thing does not have to become wrong in order to make something else right. We can combine various approaches in order to come up with a new perspective.

And that is what Meditative Psychotherapy is all about. A blend of Eastern traditions associated with the Buddhist practice of meditation and the Western philosophies of psychotherapy, meditative psychotherapy holds the tension between analyzing the human experience and letting go of the story all at once.

Elizabeth Bishop is the creator of the Conscious Service Approach designed to support helping professionals to reconnect with and fulfill their desire to make a difference in the lives of those they support. Following the completion of a diploma in Developmental Services and a degree in Psychology and Religious Studies, she completed a Masters in Adult Education through St. Francis Xavier University, providing the opportunity to test and refine the elements of the Conscious Service Approach. Elizabeth is the host of Serving Consciously, a new show on Contact Talk Radio. Simply tune in to www.ctrnetwork.com and click Listen Live at 12pm PST every 2nd and 4th Friday.

          
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Serving Consciously

Serving Consciously and The Art of Language

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How often do you really pay attention to your choice of words as you express yourself?

Do you believe in the power of language to create an experience?

Constructive Use of Language

I have long believed in the power of language and the energy we create when we choose our words carefully and what happens when we don’t.

In health care and human services, for example, we are bombarded with labels, diagnoses, syndromes, and a plethora of academic and organizational language. Within the system we currently live in where funding for services is of great focus, this kind of terminology works in our favor when we are seeking access to services and supports.

We use this language to prove that the service is needed.

Destructive Use of Language

On the other hand, much of this language serves to perpetuate stigma, prejudice, discrimination, marginalization, and ultimately separation. We tend to become reliant on certain words and jargon in order to get our point across quickly. But is this really what it’s all about?

When I began my academic preparation for human services work, I was accepted into a program that was called Mental Retardation Counselor. Shortly, after the first semester began, the program was renamed and became Developmental Services Worker. We were encouraged right from the start to always think in terms of “person first.” So, instead of saying the “autistic child,” it was preferable to say the “child with autism.”

Feels like a step in the right direction, however, if we look closely, there is still an emphasis on “autism.” And while it is so important to be aware of and honor the unique characteristics and needs of each person we are serving, it is equally crucial that we do not use these terms and diagnoses to create a limited identity for people.

For example, if you are familiar at all with the word, “autism,” there are likely a whole slew of images, ideas, and interpretations you make almost automatically about the person I am describing. And whether you would describe these images as positive or negative, affirming or destructive, the jump to the conclusion is the real problem here. At that moment, intentional or not, we have put this person inside a particular “box.” We also do this when we refer to mental health, substance abuse, survivors of childhood trauma, and on and on.

Conscious Use of Language

The challenge is to continue to open our minds so that we learn from each individual we serve and those we are blessed with in our personal lives what it means to be them. How does this person live their identity? What ELSE makes them who they are?

How can I use language to demonstrate my openness and willingness to learn about the people who come into my life? How can I speak in ways that show my deep respect for humanity and my commitment to acceptance?

This is an ongoing challenge for those of us involved in Vocations of Service. It is a continual process of integration of new knowledge, self-reflective practice, and engagement with others.

It is about being conscious as we choose the words which will best express our clearest and deepest intentions and beliefs. And if we get tongue-tied, we can always come back with something new to say.

What do you wish to see in your Service to others? How can you communicate with others so they know what you are all about?

What do you intend to create and contribute to this world? How would you explain this to a child?

If you could imagine the best possible scenario in your communities, what language would best describe it?

This is just a glimpse of a much larger discussion.

Join Us

I dove more deeply into this material in this episode of Serving Consciously with my guest, Valerie Marks.

Valarie Marks is a retired public school teacher who left her career at the age of 32 to start an educational services organization grounded in the principles of Abraham Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs;” an organization providing parents and educational institutions with resources to best nurture, protect, and educate the generations here to Re-create our world.

During her time in the classroom, Valarie also developed an English Language Arts curriculum which uses rhythmic thought patterns to teach academics, not only to build analytical skills within Common Core, but also to open up the student’s psyche for creativity and receptivity.

Valarie is also a mother to three children of her own, ages 10, 8, and 6. Because one of her sons was identified as autistic just months after her leap of faith into retirement, Valarie’s life mission in creating the “Maslow Educational Services Organization” took a sharp turn, pulling her out of the classroom entirely and deep into the world of Autism. With a population each so uniquely divine, this new chapter deepened her understanding of the needs and challenges facing the youth of today.

Valarie is currently stepping back into the classroom through her new company, “Marks Education,” where the mission is to teach children how to look at the whole English language for its individual parts, so they can craft their own words to accurately express their ideas, thoughts, and feelings, as well as to keenly understand the words and intentions of others.

She also speaks her Truth to a more intellectual audience through blogs on her Facebook page ~ Valarie Marks, through writing and short videos on topics about self-acceptance, intimacy, and unconditional love.

Valarie is here to talk about how she is serving consciously through her life mission: teaching adults how to nurture, protect, and educate a generation here to deconstruct our current world not just to restore it, but creatively recreate life as we know it into a beautiful future.

Valarie’s work is so important for those of us who wish to be actively involved in recreating the world.

I invite you to tune in to new shows and listen live by visiting www.ctrnetwork.com and clicking on Listen Live. You can access and listen to all my previous shows by visiting here.

Sign up to our members’ area for immediate access to free resources!02366666

Does language have energy and power in your books? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Serving Consciously

Conscious Service and Expressive Healing Arts

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How do we honor history and heritage in ways that help us powerfully integrate our past experiences with our present lives?

What helps us heal when we struggle with a sense of loss or grief?

How do we create our identity if we feel a sense of disconnection?

Tribute and ritual are common methods for finding peace within the turmoil.

Tribute is defined as an expression of gratitude and praise. It is meant to honor and acknowledge someone or something.

We can pay tribute to past experiences as a way of appreciating the opportunity for growth provided to us. We can express gratitude for the most challenging situations if we are able to see deeply into the tiny, yet profound gifts of wisdom buried beneath the muck.

Healing Through Art

What comes to mind when I say “Art Therapy?”

Traditionally, we have reserved this for those situations involving children who are not yet able to put language to their experience. Or, we may think of it as a medium for any individual who is unable to express verbally perhaps, as a result of disability or injury. Very often, we associate it with healing from trauma.

And this is all very true.

However, healing through Expressive Arts is a modality that can benefit anyone. Further, it does not necessarily need to be considered trauma in the most dramatic sense of the word. We can consider even the tiniest traumas that sometimes have a profound impact on our souls.

Expressive Healing Arts can include anything from painting and drawing to poetry and creative writing. You might be more inclined toward music or dance as an expression of your emotional state. Maybe your feelings speak through sculpture or jewelry design. And it doesn’t matter if you are not an expert artist. It’s all about giving voice to what you feel without the specific language.

Expressive Healing Arts with Mele Kramer

Expressive Healing Arts is the focus of this episode of Serving Consciously. I welcome my guest and an expert in this area, Mele Kramer.

Currently, Mele is pursuing her Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology/Consulting Psychology. She completed her undergraduate studies at New York University where she studied Psychology, Education, and Art and Expressive Therapies. She has been an Executive Leader in Healthcare and Education for over 15 years working in public and private sectors including hospitals, institutions, and corporations as an Educator and Leader, Public Speaker, and Change Consultant.

Her recent work has been within the cardiovascular specialty area, focusing on Leadership Training and Development with Clinicians in Hospitals with an emphasis on Transition of Care to expand awareness, education, and connection within services including alternative options for preventative and post follow up care with the goal of optimizing costs to optimize healthcare services and wellness.

Mele’s current focus is on integrative healthcare with a spotlight on harmonizing traditional and alternative health care approaches through awareness and education.  She has been a guest speaker in hospitals, conferences and educational and healthcare institutions facilitating interactive creative expressive therapy and healing workshops.

In addition, Mele advocates for International Adoptees and organizations supporting the healing of children and adults of domestic violence and abuse.  Her workshops include 100,000 Kranes for my Mother (healing tribute for Korean Adoptees), Dol Jabbi, (A Rebirthday Process) and Journey to Joy, (Phoenix Process), and Reclaiming YOU (following abusive experiences).

Benefits of Expressive Healing Arts

There is a transformative energy to expressing ourselves through creative or artistic activities. Engaging in these alternative practices allows us to get out of our own way, so to speak.

You might notice when you try to process your emotions by talking about them it’s easy to get stuck in the thoughts surrounding the feelings. In this way, we get lost in the mental pursuit of trying to understand. Now, there are benefits to exploring our interpretations of the experiences we have; it’s part of integrating the meaning it holds for us. However, it is also true some of our experiences are never going to make sense to us no matter how long we think or talk about them.

When we express ourselves in other ways, we open the door to hearing and giving voice to what emerges from our Soul. We tap into this divine wisdom allowing us to heal and to emerge stronger as a result of the circumstance. It’s in this space that acceptance is possible. We don’t think our way into integration and transformation; we feel it.

Expressive Healing Arts taps into the other side of our brain where we can access creativity and intuition. We turn off the thoughts taking us away from the truth of our hearts. This enables us to be present and engaged with our own internal process and sometimes that is all it takes.

Paying attention to our emotional state acknowledges and honors our experience and provides the opportunity for us to learn whatever is available to us through it.

How have you used artistic practices to help you heal?

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Serving Consciously

What is Meditative Psychotherapy?

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Meditative Psychotherapy is a unique synthesis of Eastern and Western thought that illuminates each discipline’s strengths and weaknesses in ways that show us how they can enrich each other.

The three elements of Meditative Psychotherapy include “stereophonic listening, understanding and meaning and liberated intimacy.” It involves the centering of self and quieting of the mind to reach greater levels of Self-Connection and deeper experiences of connection with others. And we know that deeper connection with others is the pathway to creating Transformative Relationships ~ another element of the Conscious Service Approach.

Dr. Jeffery Rubin

Jeffery Rubin, Ph.D., is the creator of meditative psychotherapy, a practice he developed through insights gained from decades of study, teaching, and helping thousands of people flourish.

The author of the critically acclaimed books Psychotherapy and Buddhism, The Good Life, and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time, Dr. Rubin is a practicing psychotherapist in New York City and Bedford Hills, NY, and has taught at various universities, psychoanalytic institutes, and Buddhist and yoga centers.

He lectures around the country and has given workshops at the United Nations, the Esalen Institute, the Open Center, the 92nd Street Y, and Yoga Sutra. His pioneering approach to Buddhism and psychotherapy has been featured in The New York Times Magazine.

I am intrigued by paradox. I love the grey area and I am curious to explore the opposite ends of the spectrum. When we talk about Meditation and Psychotherapy, we are doing just that.

Many years ago when I decided to return to university to finish my degree, I made a choice that gave me the opportunity to actively focus my learning in this way. I had previously completed a number of credits towards a degree in Psychology before putting my academic career on hold to have babies. During that time, life changed immensely and when I would think about finishing my degree, I experienced a range of emotions. Sometimes, I would think, “Oh who cares if I ever finish it?” and other times, I felt compelled to complete it simply because I didn’t like the feeling of leaving things undone.

Here is a great example of the power of informal learning ~ the wisdom we gain through simply living our lives that is often disregarded in our society. As a side note, I am convinced when it comes to being of Service in the world, we must begin to honor more deeply the wisdom gained through the school of life in ways that integrate what we innately know as human beings with the theoretical and foundational philosophies associated with helping professions.

Anyway, one day, I decided it was time to go back and finish that degree. As a result of the soul-searching I’d been doing, I couldn’t bring myself to simply return for 3 credits and complete the Psychology degree; it just wasn’t the crux of what most interested me anymore. So, I enrolled in a program that would have me graduate with a double major in Psychology and Religious Studies. I didn’t realize at the time I would be embarking on a journey that would challenge me in paradoxical ways and pull me in opposite directions at times. And I wouldn’t trade that experience for the world.

Opposite Ends of The Spectrum

Psychology is considered a science. There is research and studies and numbers and stats to consider. The emphasis is on proving something and generating data in order to understand human experience.

Religious Studies, depending on where you focus, is much more abstract, without much physical evidence, and has very little to do with numbers and data. Well, at least this was true for me as I chose courses more focused on Spirituality as opposed to the history of Religion or the state of the Church in our society.

People used to ask me “What are you going to do with that degree?” In other words, how would this benefit me vocationally? I could never answer that question. And I still don’t have a solid response. What I can say is it was important to me to follow my curiosity and to follow the path which held the most passion and interest for me. I knew somehow this combination of learning was a way of honoring what I already knew and what I wanted to learn. And I knew it was related to my desire to be of Service in the world.

And you know what? I have drawn on the learning I gained through my studies in Psychology and Religious Studies, coupled with my background in Developmental Services to create the foundation of what is now the Conscious Service Approach.

It All Works Together for Good

There is no one right way or one path to go down. One thing does not have to become wrong in order to make something else right. We can combine various approaches in order to come up with a new perspective.

And that is what Meditative Psychotherapy is all about. A blend of Eastern traditions associated with the Buddhist practice of meditation and the Western philosophies of psychotherapy, meditative psychotherapy holds the tension between analyzing the human experience and letting go of the story all at once.

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Serving Consciously

Service Through the Written Word

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When was the last time you read a book or an article and felt like it had been written just for you? In fact, you may have caught yourself wondering if your picture was going to be on the next page as an example of someone who has lived what the author has described. I know this has happened to me more than once in my lifetime.

I have been blessed many times through a book I’ve read. Sure, we often search out reading material that is relevant to our experience or curiosity at the time, so we might come to the experience already expecting ~ or at least hoping ~ we will be enlightened, validated, or soothed on some level. And it is a gift when we find exactly what we are looking for ~ most of the time!

I believe many authors ~ especially in the world of self-help and spirituality ~ seek to serve others through their writing. In fact, I have read comments and heard interviews with well-known writers who have expressed their writing practice has first and foremost been a self-transformative process ~ one that may have begun without any consideration as to whether it would serve others or not.

The Creative Energy of Writing

Writing is a creative endeavor whether we are journaling our private thoughts, developing professional materials, or writing the next best seller in creative fiction. When writing engages us on a holistic level, it becomes a channel through which we can express our deepest musings and lay bare our souls.

As Service Providers, we are often engaged in a variety of writing activities. In the traditional sense, we write case notes and progress reports outlining the details of our engagement with the people we are serving. We may write program reviews and other more business-like materials as an element of our position. Whether providing service traditionally or alternatively, we may have opportunities to write for publication or research dissemination over the course of our careers. There are countless opportunities to express ourselves through the written word.

How we choose to do this with the energy to serve others is important. The words we choose, the dedication to writing clear observations as opposed to personal opinion, the desire to demonstrate respect for privacy and compassion for the individual who will read it are all aspects of how we serve others through our writing.

Journaling can be one of the most powerful tools we have at our disposal as Service Providers ~ tools can not only provide a safe space for the venting of emotions and challenges, but also a tool that helps guide you to the deepest parts of who you are and how you show up in service to others.

Through creative writing, we can lose ourselves in a private world of fantasy and make-believe that may have some similarity to our real-life experiences. Through this practice, we can create our own alternative endings ~ the ones that light up our hearts and spark our inspiration.

Join Us

On this episode of Serving Consciously, I welcomed my guest, Joyce Sweeney.

Joyce Sweeney is the author of fourteen novels for young adults and two chapbooks of poetry. Her first novel, “Center Line”, won the First Annual Delacorte Press Prize for an Outstanding Young Adult Novel. Many of her books appear on the American Library Association’s Best Books List and Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers. Her novel “Shadow” won the Nevada State Reading Award in 1997. Her novel “Players” was chosen by Booklist as a Top Ten Sports Book and by Working Mother magazine as a Top Ten for Tweens. Her novel, “Headlock” (Holt 2006), won a Silver Medal in the 2006 Florida Book Awards and was chosen by the American Library Association as a Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers.

Her first chapbook of poems, “IMPERMANENCE”, was published in 2008 by Finishing Line Press. Her second chapbook, entitled “WAKE UP”, was released in February.

Joyce has also been a writing teacher and coach for 25 years, beginning with teaching five-week classes for the Florida Center for the Book, moving to ongoing invitation-only workshops and finally to online classes which reach students nationally and internationally. Developing strong bonds with the students, critiquing and instructing is her hallmark. She believes writers need emotional support as well as strong, craft-based teaching if they are to make the long, arduous, but very worthwhile journey to traditional publication. At this writing, 57 of Joyce’s students have successfully made this journey and obtained traditional publishing contracts.

In 2011, Joyce and a coalition of local playwrights, directors, and actors formed The Playgroup LLC, which conducts workshops for playwrights and actors and produces original works by local playwrights. The Playgroup currently presents three productions a year at their home base, The Willow Theatre in Boca Raton.

Joyce lives in Coral Springs with her husband, Jay and caffeine-addicted cat, Nitro. You can learn more about Joyce and her services on her website.

How has the service of writing touched your life?

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Mental Health

Get Comfortable With Not Knowing

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How easy is it for you to be in a state of not knowing? Not knowing what will happen next? Not knowing your next step? Not knowing who you are as you’ve evolved into this present moment?

Not knowing can be an unsettling prospect. We like to know. We like to think that we know.

It is much more comfortable to feel like we have it all figured out ~ like we are guaranteed the outcome of our desires. And most of the time, we do feel like we are in the know when it comes to what our day will bring and what we can expect from each other.

The truth is though, that things can change on a dime. We find a sense of security with the thought that we can expect things to move along as they always have. Of course, we feel more secure when that expected direction is something that we want.

Alternatively, when we find ourselves stuck in situations that challenge us, we might pray for things to change while harbouring a suspicion that they never will because we know how these things have always played out in our lives before.

What if we got really cozy with the very real state of not knowing? What if we made friends with the reality that we could be surprised at any moment? And what if we began to anticipate that these surprises could be enriching and life-affirming as opposed to dark and threatening?

Serving Consciously

Recently on Serving Consciously, I interviewed Alexander Demetrius who has immersed himself in the vast expanse of the unknown and has discovered the rewards inherent in it.

Alexander Demetrius

Alexander Demetrius’ literary contributions have primarily been influenced by Joseph Campbell. During his lifetime, Campbell was one of the world’s foremost authorities on global mythology. Using Campbell’s monomyth or hero’s journey, Demetrius discovered that critical events from his past paralleled the typical sequence of events found in practically every narrative throughout the world.

The Reward of Not Knowing is an account of Demetrius’ memoirs, transformed into an epic journey that began in San Antonio, Texas, and spans across the Pacific Ocean to Honolulu, Hawaii, where he currently resides. What makes his journey unique is that much of it took place within, where so few ever voyage.

Through careful reflection and examination, he overcame some paralyzing characteristics that once constrained him to a life of insanity, orchestrated by his mother who suffers from dissociative identity disorder or multiple personalities.

Tap into All that You Do Know

It is easier said than done ~ this idea of being comfortable not knowing. Sure, we can acknowledge that we are lacking information in the moment or that we can’t see the next step on the path, but feeling comfortable with it? That’s another story.

To assist ourselves in this process, we can shift our focus to what we do know for sure.

Do you know that you can trust yourself?

Do you know that you can have faith in the process?

Do you know that you are capable of getting back up EVERY time you fall down?

Do you know that you are loved?

How connected are you to your resiliency?

How connected are you to your capacity to care for yourself?

How connected are you to your internal guidance system ~ your intuition?

How connected are you to a sense of self-love and self-worth?

If things go wrong, do you know that you can course correct?

If you feel unsupported, do you know you have your own back?

If you are frightened by what’s around the next corner, do you know that you can face whatever comes?

If you can’t see the forest for the trees, do you know that clarity resides within you and will eventually emerge?

Tune into all that you know to be true regardless of any evidence. Allow the unknown to exist without pressure from you to be different. Be patient as new information becomes available.

Learn to dance with the mystery.

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Mental Health

Conscious Service and The Role of Intuition

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I love talking about intuition and even more than that, I love connecting to my intuition. I find intuitive moments to be highly energizing and uniquely interesting ~ sometimes, even entertaining.

What do you think about intuition? Is it a function or our physiological brain? Is it a function of our spirit ~ our hearts? Maybe, it’s a combination of both?

I have always felt that intuitive guidance was spiritual in nature ~ that it involved my heart and soul and would express itself to me through feelings and sensations that I would experience in my body. Intuition would come to me through ideas and messages that I would think and hear. If the answer was no, it feels a certain way in my body. Yes, has it’s own vibration as well.

The Sixth Sense

They call intuition the “sixth sense” for a reason. We receive information from and about the world in us and around us through our senses. We see, hear, feel, taste, and smell ~ and we intuit. It is through our senses that we interpret our experiences.

Intuition works in much the same way as our other senses and also communicates to us through our senses. We all have the capacity to access intuitive guidance. Some of us are more naturally inclined intuitively and everyone can strengthen intuitive abilities. In that way, intuition is much like a muscle ~ the more we use it, the stronger it gets. The more we tune into it, the greater the likelihood is that we will receive its communication more readily. As you grow to trust your intuitive messages and follow your inner guidance more frequently, you will notice that there are greater stores of information available to you. It will become second nature to simply tune into to what you are picking up on through your intuition.

Intuitive Messages

I often experience my intuition through messages in the outer world. I have found myself asking questions or pondering a challenge in my life and suddenly I’ll drive past a billboard and the message is loud and clear. I’ll turn on the radio to receive my guidance through the lyrics of a song. I open a book and my eyes land on a passage that illuminates a deeper insight or affirms what my heart already knows.

Your intuition will communicate with you through symbols and images, thoughts and feelings that are familiar to you ~ that already have meaning for you. Your intuition is there to enlighten you ~ not to trick you.

Setting the intention to hear your intuitive guidance is a simple and yet powerful way to open yourself and set the stage to receive. You can engage in centering practices in the morning to do this and you can also simply take any moment in time to extend the invitation and indicate your readiness and willingness to listen.

I find that it is also imperative to detach ~ to let go ~ of the outcome, my hoped for message, and the way that the intuitive information comes through. And, of course, the timing of the message. If I stay attached to a particular response, I will likely misinterpret the voice of my ego for the wisdom of my intuition and this is potentially dangerous or at the very least painful in some way. If I cannot find the patience to sit quietly within until the answer arrives, I will likely jump the gun and attempt to control situations in my life just to make something happen.

The reality is that our intuitive guidance is always there and available to us and quite often speaks to us very quickly. When it feels like it’s taking too long, it is usually because we don’t want to hear what we already know. And we always know. Part of the beauty of our humanity is that we are wired to survive and some aspect of ourselves will protect us from truths we aren’t quite ready to acknowledge.

Enter courage and curiosity. Enter trust and faith. When you can become courageous enough to get really curious about the mysterious nature of your existence, you can come face to face with the unknown and know that you are safe and that you will be led and protected when you listen closely to your internal guidance system.

Quiet your mind. Still your heart. Take a deep breath. And listen.

You have everything you need.

Interview with Lucca Hallex

In an interview with Lucca Hallex, I explore this topic of Intuition and the role it has in Conscious Service for the Consciously Serving podcast.

Lucca Hallex

Lucca Hallex works with the process of empowerment and remembering who you are – what you came to our little blue planet to passionately experience, share and create.

She coaches clients to find the source of their power at the very deepest level by using her intuition and encouraging them to use theirs, including running a unique Intuition Incubator to help people learn how to ‘speak intuition’.

Her work is not about ‘business as usual’. She engages at the edge of the current wisdom about ‘work’, where the present and future leaders of the emerging new paradigm are exploring what ‘new’ means for their professional lives and the communities in which they thrive.

Lucca co-creates with change-makers who are pushing boundaries and challenging themselves, who foster change by ‘working at the edge’ of what they know about themselves, how they want to move through the world and what impact they want to have. She builds on their experience and passion, to create a future that is inspiring to get up to each day.

Her clients say that the work truly changes their lives:

  • ‘Working with Lucca has softened my doubt and shored up my courage’
  • ‘Working with her has definitely strengthened my ‘intuitive muscles’. It’s putting a spotlight on a specific situation and gradually pulling it further away to light up the bigger picture’
  • ‘She has a deep respect for her client’s free will without pushing one to do anything’
  • ‘…most precious to me is a deeper listening to what I know to be true’
  • ‘I finally feel like my chess pieces are all on the board aligned properly and the game is ready to commence’

Lucca calls herself a Power Sourcerer – pun intended! This has evolved out her career in both business and personal development, as a facilitator, coach, counselor and psychic. In her free time, she co-hosts a weekly community radio program called Essencetial Conversations – conversations with change-makers about their essence and passion. She believes we are all one and that our differences are what unite and empower us and not what divides or diminish us.

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