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Aging

10 Useful Apps for Your Tech-Savvy Aged Parent

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Are your parents aging but still wanting to keep in touch, be in the know, and continue to be avid fans of their smartphones? Now is a great time to be a tech-savvy senior, as they have far more options to choose from when it comes to applications designed to keep their lives simpler and more streamlined. While your mother or father may be huge fans of the new phones available, they may not be aware of all the great options.

They can do more than shop for best deals for catheters online; now they can take control of their lives with some great new products.

Here are ten apps every tech-happy parent should download onto their phone.

1. Pillboxie

This useful app, which is only available for iPhone, gives a visual guide to help with daily, short-term, or weekly medications. Rather than just a note that pops up on your calendar, this is a virtual medicine cabinet that helps users see and organize their meds easily, gives them a gentle reminder to mark what they have taken and see if they missed anything. This app is great for anyone taking medication that just needs a little reminder not to miss a day.

2. Mint Bills and Money

This application is here to make sure you never miss a bill payment. Available for Android as well as iPhone, the app is especially nice because, after its initial set-up, all that’s needed is a quick confirmation to go ahead and digitally pay a bill. This app makes sure that the power never goes off, the cable is always on, and the gas is available. It can also monitor your bank accounts and credit cards to show you any unusual activity or just help you check your balance. No more forgetting a payment or making troublesome trips to the bank.

3. Goodreads

Reading is such a great activity for all of us but, especially, for those of us getting on in years. This app completes the experience with a social element—users can make friends with other fans of their favorite books and leave messages for one another. Book reviews are also encouraged, and readers can list books they plan to read in the future, as well as communicate with their favorite authors. Best of all, the app is free and available for all phones and tablets.

4. Words with Friends

This app goes beyond note writing or just chatting. With this popular word game application, users can challenge friends, family, or random users to a game of scrabble. While traditional rules apply, this app puts a new twist on an old favorite. The game has no time limit, so one match can last if the two opponents need to do other things, they can message one another in the chat section, and those who want to play alone have the solo play option.

Anyone looking for a new friend to play also has the Smart Match option. This option evaluates one’s skill level and matches them to someone at a similar level. Scrabble champions can easily find others who can keep up with them while beginners do not have to get creamed by a pro.

5. Spotify

You may think of Spotify—for Android as well as iPhone—as a place to find new music, but it is also a great place to find old favorites. Does your dad go on and on about the genius of Lawrence Welk? He can find the man’s music here. Users can create personalized radio stations based on their interests and even use the app on their desktop computer to fill the room with their favorite tunes. Don’t be surprised if you catch them dancing once they have their membership.

6. Skype

Keeping in touch is extremely important to everyone in your family, especially those who are getting older. Skype is a wonderful, free app that can be used on a desktop or any phone. The technology combines video and audio for a great option to catch up. Group conversation options are also available, as well as calling a landline or cell phone if necessary. See new babies, check in on distant relatives, and even go exploring together with the help of this very fun application.

7. Lumosity

Designed to keep brains active and memory alive, Lumosity is essentially a gym for your brain that you can access from any phone or tablet. The games on this application were designed by neuroscientists in hopes of helping people challenge themselves mentally and do so in a way that is entertaining and helps them have fun.

You will not feel like you are taking a test, but rather like you are playing a low-key, entertaining video game. The application can help prevent mental issues like Alzheimer’s and dementia. It also just improves general cognition so anyone can jump in on the fun. The app has gone worldwide for a reason—it is just great!

8. Blood Pressure Monitor

Only available for Apple phones, Blood Pressure Monitor helps users take control of their heart health and keep track of their pressure, their heart rates, and their activity. The app comes complete with reminders to take medicine or do an activity, as well as help to export any unusual activity to a doctor’s email. While this is not meant to replace any professional tools, it can help anyone with heart concerns feel better with a visual chart of just how their heart is doing and give a clear warning when something is going wrong.

9. Evernote

Evernote is an especially good one for senior citizens living alone or with limited care. The digital notebook comes in three versions, from free to premium, and offers all kinds of things. Listing different things to remember, a to-do list, audio notes, digitizing business cards, and just writing out documents are all available for both Android and Apple users. Also, it syncs up phones with desktop computers so that it can be used from any interface. Never forget a thing with the help of this great digital personal assistant.

10. WebMD Pain Coach

You have likely already used the WebMD website, which helps identify problems through symptoms, but you may not have tried this great app, though you and your parents absolutely should. It is designed to be a holistic approach to pain management and to take the mystery out of health problems, the app has a pain tracker, offers advice on pain reduction, and helps the user keep a kind of journal to show their doctor to help explain the problem. The app also has a daily goal tracker, dietary suggestions, and a built-in library of articles about preventative health to help users.

Roger Sims serves as the owner for LoCost Medical Supply, LLC. Roger oversees the family owned and operated medical supply company from the Duluth, Georgia headquarters. In 1985, the Sims family began providing medical supplies in a corner drug store named HealthWise Family Pharmacy in the Atlanta suburbs and although they do not operate a pharmacy these days, they continue to place the highest value on trust, customer service, knowledge, and excellence.

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Aging

Social Workers Can Now Learn Medicare Online and Earn Continuing Education Hours

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Social workers can now earn continuing education hours while they learn Medicare at their own pace, anytime and anywhere with Medicare Interactive (MI) Pro, an online Medicare curriculum powered by the Medicare Rights Center.

MI Pro provides the information that social workers and health professionals need to become “Medicare smart,” so they can help their clients navigate the Medicare maze. The online curriculum contains information on the rules and regulations regarding Medicare—from Medicare coverage options and coordination of benefits to the appeals process and assistance programs for clients with low incomes.

“For over 25 years, social workers have been turning to Medicare Rights’ helpline counselors for clear and concise information on how to help their clients access the affordable health care that they need,” said Joe Baker, president of the Medicare Rights Center. “Now social workers can enroll in MI Pro and learn—or enhance—their Medicare knowledge at their convenience while fulfilling their continuing education requirements.”

The Medicare Rights Center, a national nonprofit consumer service organization, is the largest and most reliable independent source of Medicare information and assistance in the United States.

Licensed Master Social Workers and Licensed Clinical Social Workers can earn continuing education hours when they successfully complete any of the four MI Pro programs: Medicare Basics; Medicare Coverage Rules; Medicare Appeals and Penalties; and Medicare, Other Insurance, and Assistance Programs. Each MI Pro program is comprised of four to five course modules.

All MI Pro programs are active for one year following registration.

MI Pro courses are nominally priced. Additionally, social workers who purchase all four programs at once will receive an automatic 20 percent discount.

Medicare Rights Center is a national, nonprofit consumer service organization that works to ensure access to affordable health care for older adults and people with disabilities through counseling and advocacy, educational programs, and public policy initiatives.

Available only through the Medicare Rights Center, Medicare Interactive (MI) is a free and independent online reference tool that provides easy-to-understand answers to questions posed by people with Medicare, their families and caregivers, and the professionals serving them. Find your Medicare answers at www.medicareinteractive.org.

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Elder Care

The Critical Role of Caregivers, and What they Need from Us

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Caring for loved ones who have aged or become disabled is not a new concept. Many of the services provided in hospitals, clinics and even funeral homes were once provided by families at home. Particularly in communities where traditional cultural beliefs are highly valued, taking care of an aging parent or grandparent is still a responsibility that families (usually women) are expected to take upon themselves. Inner discord can arise when caregivers challenge these traditions which can lead to guilt and in some cases lawsuits.

For example, proceedings from a roundtable hosted by the National Hispanic Council on Aging revealed that caregiver stigma is prevalent among Latinos, which can prevent them from seeking support and resources. Without help, the risk for burnout increases.

Results from a 2015 study by the National Alliance for Family Caregiving and AARP revealed that “an estimated 43.5 million adults in the United States have provided unpaid care to an adult or a child in the prior 12 months”. This number is likely to increase in the coming years due, in part, to an aging population.

Family caregivers perform a variety of services, including helping with ADLs, dispensing medications, managing finances, attending doctor appointments and advocating. Many do so while maintaining full-time employment outside of the home.

Respite is Essential, but lacking

The physical cost of caregiving is staggering, and there are few opportunities for respite. Even when respite is available, caregivers must consider the care recipients’ safety, and their desire to leave home. A person who has a disability or is ill can still make decisions regarding their care. So when they say no to respite care, it can’t be forced upon them. Desperate for a break, some caregivers have gone to extreme measures such as dropping off their loved one at the emergency room for respite. This is a problem that should be addressed in the years to come. But how?

Changes in the workplace

More companies and organizations are beginning to understand that caregiving without support can negatively impact worker productivity. In response, some companies have revisited their policies regarding family leave, allowing flexible work schedules and work from home opportunities. As employers seek new talent, they may find that policies such as these are attractive to job seekers. Two major companies, Deloitte and Microsoft, made headlines after incorporating paid time into their family leave policies. Other companies have adopted similar models.

As the nation grapples with how to provide better support to caregivers, it will need to improve major areas like extending paid leave to family caregivers, creating financial stability for those who need to provide full time care, and providing necessary training and respite to ensure the mental and physical well being for both the caregiver and the recipient. These changes require a shift in how we think about providing care, and changes in policy.

Accessible resources

Caregivers are operating on tight schedules and don’t always have time to attend in person support groups. So having the option of connecting with others through online chats and support groups is more convenient for some caregivers. In addition, they could benefit from ongoing training and resources that will help them to more effectively and safely care for their loved one. This past September, the U.S. Senate passed the RAISE Act, which would require the development of a national strategy to address the growing challenges and economic impact of caregiving. The bill must now go before the House of Representatives.

Money

The financial costs of caregiving cannot be ignored, and the average social security beneficiary does not earn enough to shoulder the burden of the financial costs they incur. Most caregivers likely work not only to maintain a sense of identity but also out of necessity.

Caregivers can face stressful decisions when it comes to choosing between work and providing care, particularly when their loved one is seriously or terminally ill. Too often, relatives are not eligible to be a paid for their time. And when they are, the earnings are not enough to make ends meet. Unfortunately, many caregivers often place their loved ones in skilled nursing facilities, simply because they cannot afford to care for them at home.

The question of who should provide care and how they will provide is one that has yet to be answered. While they wait, however, caregivers are facing stress and financial burden with few desirable options for support. And care recipients aren’t getting the care they so desperately need.

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Aging

AARP Applauds Unanimous Senate Passage of RAISE Family Caregivers Act

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AARP applauds the unanimous passage in the U.S. Senate of the bipartisan Recognize, Assist, Include, Support, and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Act (S. 1028).

The legislation, introduced by Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), calls for the development of a strategy to support the nation’s 40 million family caregivers. It would bring together stakeholders from the private and public sectors to recommend actions that communities, providers, government, and others are taking and may take to help make the big responsibilities of caregiving a little bit easier.

It would bring together stakeholders from the private and public sectors to recommend actions that communities, providers, government, and others are taking and may take to help make the big responsibilities of caregiving a little bit easier.

Every day, millions of Americans are caring for parents, spouses, children and adults with disabilities and other loved ones so they can live independently in their homes and communities for as long as possible. They take on a range of tasks including managing medications, helping with bathing and dressing, preparing and feeding meals, arranging transportation, and handling financial and legal matters. The unpaid care family caregivers provide helps delay or prevent costly nursing home care, which is often paid for by Medicaid.

“Family caregivers are the backbone of our care system in America. We need to make it easier for them to coordinate care for their loved ones, get information and resources and take a break so they can rest and recharge,” said AARP Chief Advocacy & Engagement Officer Nancy A. LeaMond. “Thanks to the efforts of long-time champions of the bill Senators Susan Collins and Tammy Baldwin, we are one step closer to helping address the challenges family caregivers face.” AARP is working to bolster bipartisan support for the RAISE Family Caregivers Act in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The bill (H.R. 3759) was introduced by Representatives Gregg Harper (R-MS) and Kathy Castor (D-FL), along with original cosponsors Representatives Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) and Elise Stefanik (R-NY). The RAISE Family Caregivers Act has the support of about 60 national organizations.

For more information and to track this bill visit Congress.gov.

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