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Employment

5 Do’s and Do Not’s of Interviews

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There are several postings available on things to say to land the interview, how to dress or how to shake hands, but what about things the employer should do or not do?

Living and trying to find employment in this market is difficult across the globe and recent graduates struggle to find their first job. The search for the prefect candidate is difficult.  Being a part of the caring profession, most interviewees are assessing each agency or office the same way they were trained to look at clients and family systems.

This post is meant to shine a light on some major employment faux pas that have taken place in several work places to a number of working professionals.  Therefore, a list of the top five do’s and do not’s has been created.

DO ask the applicant about their unique approach

The applicant is looking for the space to discuss their style and their theoretical framework, most social workers and mental health professionals have an area they are passionate about, this question leads the applicant to discuss in greater detail the accomplishments they have made in their prior work

DO NOT ask about the relational status of the applicant

The employer does not need to know about a pending nuptial or a broken marriage in the hiring process, in fact this line of questioning is illegal. The unfortunate part is that the topic can come up in conversation in narrative style interviews and there is where the waters get a little murky.

DO talk about goal planning and the future goals of the applicant

This question does two things, it assesses how long an applicant is planning on working with the company, and it gives the employer the opportunity to look for specialties they may be able to offer in the future with the applicant.

DO NOT probe for information about babies and family planning

Questions like: “Do you have children?” Or “Oh did you just get married, that’s why you need health insurance” these questions are against the law and even if the goal of the employer is to connect with the applicant over a commonality it is an invasive and unnecessary in any meeting to discuss future employment.

DO discuss the agencies culture and how the applicant sees themselves working with the company

Discuss what it is like to work with the staff and how the agency works, this leads into social skills and the interactive component of working with others, this question assesses teamwork and it hints to the way an applicant may work with their clients.

DO NOT ask targeted race related questions

Questions about a last name, the applicants coloring or asking if the perspective employee is of a specific race are all questions that are unnecessary and illegal.

DO talk about ways to support the applicant and their thoughts on what support looks like

Discuss trainings and support the company offers their employees. This question moves into educational support as well as supervision and self-care, all extremely important in preventing burnout and increasing workplace satisfaction.

DO NOT ask or probe for information about the applicant’s age

Questions about graduation dates, or insinuations based upon the applicant’s appearances are not welcomed and are considered discriminatory.

DO ask questions based off of the resume and application

Questions about specific experiences are appreciated because they provide the platform for the applicant to sell themselves and provide to the employer a better snapshot of your level of competency.

DO NOT inquire about the mental status of the applicant

This is a question that comes up more in the helping profession than anywhere else. For many clinical directors conducting interviews, it is important to remember that the interviewee is NOT a client. Asking off putting questions about possible diagnoses are off putting, illegal, and do not sell the company as a possible referral site once the interviewee lands a job elsewhere.

These are not only invasive they are against the law, click on this link for a complete listing of illegal questions and the laws in the United States of America.

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Amanda Huber is the Immigration and Social Policy Staff Writer for Social Work Helper. She is a bilingual social worker in clinical practice and a community organizer for Latino rights which includes issues of migratory status, institutional racism, racial profiling, and the ways these issues affect the people.

          
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