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Hackney Child – An Interview with Jenny Molloy

Deona Hooper 2013/12/20
hackneychild Hackney Child   An Interview with Jenny Molloy

Hackney Child

Hackney Child is a riveting book about the challenges a child encounters growing up in the care system. The book is based on true life events of author Jenny Malloy who uses the pen name Hope Daniels written with Morag Livingstone.

I had the opportunity to interview Jenny in order to get a first hand account on how writing this book has transformed her life. Jenny tells a tale of resilience and courage, but also one of system failures and needed programs to help families function better.

According to the Hackney Child’s website,

“Hackney Child is a shocking reminder of what some children are subjected to as they grow up. The scars can last a lifetime and there is no certainty they will ever heal. The best way is always to fight back. Hope Daniels has done this and displayed great courage in reliving the events of her childhood through this manuscript. I wish her all the success in the world’ Hackney Child offers a supportive Advice and Training role which will remind Social Workers why they chose the vocation of Social Work, and why Looked After Children are so special.

SWH: Tell us about your thought processes and decision to write Hackney Child, and how did you go about the process?

JM: This is such a big question! My thoughts on writing Hackney Child was that I was very very scared about being judged. I was adamant that I would remain anonymous, and this is why I have a pen name, Hope Daniels. I was absolutely paranoid that my mum would hate me for doing this but decided to write it with Morag and decided we would go ahead at the end.

I went through a massive rollercoaster of emotions and feelings throughout – and had to take a couple of months off at one point, as you see, when writing Hackney Child, I was totally transported back in a way that I had never experienced before. I found myself reflecting on my childhood, and my experience in Care, and whilst it was cathartic, it was also extremely painful. Myself and Morag had 1-1 interviews, I sent writing, we used my SS Files, and Morag interviewed 1 person who had applied to foster me. We spent much time sending writing between us until we got the story right.

SWH: As a result of your book and experiences, have you been engaged with the thought leaders within the social care UK system to implement changes or improvements for children who are cared for?

JM: Yes, in so many ways, and continue to do so. I was influential in producing the Care Leavers Charter, endorsed and implemented through the Care Leavers Foundation, Care Leavers, and the Children’s Minister, Edward Timpson. I am currently working alongside OFSTED, Martin Narey – Government TSAR on LAC, The Chief Social Worker, and many thought leaders in Scotland, including the Scottish Government.

I have also devised a training programme based on my own recovery from my childhood and addiction, and have been sharing with Local Authorities. It has received a response which I didn’t expect, one of enthusiasm, passion to carry the learning’s through to direct work, and an understanding of what it is really like to live through an abusive childhood, a life in care, and then life as a care leaver.

My time working with frontline social workers, Care Leavers and kids currently in the system is what drives me to work within the policy world. I have met huge number of inspirational kids and professionals, that when the going gets tough, and my frustrations at changes not happening quick enough, motivate me to stick at it.

SWH: What are some of the biggest challenges you face in doing outreach to practitioners/providers and children who are in long term care?

JM: Accepting the flaws in the system, and accepting that I cannot rescue the kids.

SWH: What is your mission and vision for Hackney’s Child, and what do you hope to ultimately accomplish?

JM: My mission is to make the UK Care System a place where LAC are loved, protected and successful.

There will always be a need for safe secure and loving places for some children to be cared for away from their birth families; to enable this Hackney Child strives to:

  • Ensure all children in care are safe and protected by those who care for them
  • Every child in care is expected to succeed, and receives the emotional and practical support to do so.
  • All children in care receive equal opportunity to recover from trauma experienced.
  • Those acting as corporate parents understand and take personal responsibility for developing and safeguarding the children they care for.

My ultimate goal is for the shocking statistics around Care Leavers, homelessness, drug addiction, offending, revolving door prisoner sentences and repeating, at times, the cycle of Care for their children to be seen as a failure, of the system, that served to rescue them, and the fire in your belly anger that should be aroused at these statistics by the policy makers raises itself, and changes happen.

It’s too easy to blame front line staff, who, in my personal view, are passionate, caring, skilled people who have an inner vocation to change children’s lives

SWH: Most importantly, what is your life like now, and have you found a sense of peace through your work and writing?

JM: My life is beautiful. I had no idea who I was, how I could ever have a life away from the pain, shame and guilt that I had carried for so many years, which I have discovered through Hackney Child and my direct work with the “Care System’, wasn’t mine to carry. I was a child.

I have worked through strategies on dealing with the sorrow that comes over me at times, together with the flashbacks of my childhood, some which are forever new and haven’t come to me in years, and now use these strategies with the children and young people that I work with.

I have 2 wonderful kids, now grown up, a husband who helped me to accept my character assets, and a beautiful, content granddaughter, who will never have to experience a mother with the pain that her grandmother had.

I’m now proud to say that I was raised in the Care System, and not ashamed to say that my family consists of people who were my social workers and care home staff. I love them and they love me. My family is now free from my past.

0 Hackney Child   An Interview with Jenny Molloy

About Author

Deona Hooper

Deona Hooper, MSW is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Social Work Helper. Experienced web designer, social media strategist, and analyst with a Masters in Social Work with a concentration in Management and Community Practice as well as a Certificate in Nonprofit Management both from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Available for consulting and guest lecturing. View all posts by Deona Hooper →

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